Moscow Visitors

I feel so lucky to have had visitors during my three years in Moscow. There’s nothing better than showing people you love around your new town. I continue to explore Moscow and having visitors is an awesome excuse to get to all those places I’ve put off or haven’t seen in a while.

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In March, my good friend Katie came for a visit. I’m sure her vacation destination was a bit of surprise to her fellow teachers but she made an amazing effort of it, traveling all the way from Minnesota on her spring break. A strong solo traveler, she took in Moscow while I worked and even trekked to St. Petersburg on her own. For those wondering, seeing both cities is definitely doable within a week.

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A Moscow Metro rite of passage for good luck at Площадь Революции (Ploshchad Revolyutsii)

Highlights of Katie’s visit included a brunch at the Metropol Hotel, touring the Kremlin Armory, and a Georgian feast (see below).

Just a few weeks ago, I hosted my aunt Susan for her first ever visit to Russia. Suz is a wonderful person to travel with and we planned her visit over the Victory Day holidays to get in a little extra time together.

When I was living in Korea, Suz gamely hopped a plane and visited me in Seoul. We went to China together, putting in thousands of steps all over Beijing and Xian. There really is nothing like sharing an incredible trip with someone you love and I’m so thankful to have family who are up for it!

Suz and I on a canal in St. Petersburg

We hopped the SapSan fast train up to St. Petersburg for what’s become a bit of a May tradition for me. We traveled on Victory Day which brought a few road closures but no major issues. The coolest, most powerful sight upon arrival was the Parade of the Immortals, commemorating the over 27 million (MILLION) Soviet soldiers and citizens lost in the Great War (World War II). St. Petersburg itself (as Leningrad) was under siege for over 900 days, the horrendous losses reverberating through the crowd carrying photographs of their loved ones lost. This is not a nation that will ever forget.

The Parade of the Immortals. Participants themselves number in the millions.
The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood, St. Petersburg
Suz in the Winter Palace, Hermitage Museum

One of the highlights of our trip was seeing my first ballet at the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg’s famed ballet stage. Only slightly smaller in size than the Bolshoi, the venue was stunningly gorgeous with supremely gifted dancers and magnificent stage sets. Made for the perfect birthday present – all thanks to my dad.

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Catherine Palace, St. Petersburg

Another highlight from our St. Petersburg was a trip to Catherine Palace, a spot about 30 km outside of town. A summer palace for the tsars, the place is dripping in gold and excess. Each room is more stunning than the last – there is even a grand ballroom which evokes vibes of the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.

With the solstice quickly approaching, white nights are coming to St. Pete’s

Back in Moscow, we toured around as much as my school schedule would allow. Something new in the travelsphere is Airbnb Experiences. Many of you may use Airbnb rentals in cities around the world. The website now offers additional experiences at a fraction of the cost of private tours. I found Suz a walking tour of the Kremlin area of Moscow and she had a really nice time with her local Russian guide, Sveta. They traded stories and questions about culture, both in the States and here. I really can’t recommend a chance like this enough, especially for the opportunity to meet someone local. Call it next-level traveling but it truly enriches the experience.

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Suz picked the perfect time of year to be in Moscow – not too hot but no more snow!

As I look forward to two more years here in Moscow, consider this an open invitation! This city is constantly evolving and updating, and certainly has a past worthy of any history buff’s time. You never know – you might wake up to find this goober waiting to greet you 😉

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Venice of the North

Italy or Russia? St. Petersburg’s waterways boast a decidedly European flair.

While my parents were still in town, I was able to sneak away for a 3-day weekend to this wonderful spot many call the Venice of the North. As Russia’s second largest city, St. Petersburg wears many hats – Baltic seaport, former capital city, and European enclave.

St. Petersburg was founded by Czar Peter the Great in 1703. Peter, a great fan of the sea, sought to bring European prestige to Imperial Russia by installing a seat of government in the port city. The founder of the Russian Navy (among his many accomplishments), Peter spent time in his youth traveling across Europe. In Holland he learned to sail, which resulted – as my friend Niek informs me – in the inclusion of many Dutch terms in Russian sailing lexicon. The move to St. Petersburg was a calculated one, ushering in a new era of military fortitude which now included the Baltic Fleet and a decidedly European aesthetic.

Today St. Petersburg is considered to be the cultural capital of Russia. The Hermitage, Russia’s most prestigious art museum, is located on the banks of the Neva River. Many famous writers have called St. Petersburg home – Pushkin, Gogol, and Dostoevsky to name a few. Today the city remains a haven for artists, attracting like-minded types from across Russia and Europe.

The breadth of art in St. Petersburg is absolutely stunning – from the immense Hermitage collection to the hallowed halls of the Russian Museum, you can find whatever you seek. During our morning spent at the Hermitage, I was most impressed with its gilded architecture such as that seen below. Walking the halls end-to-end, there is simply too much to take in. We opted to flutter in and out of various rooms, catching a few famous works, but mostly drinking in the grandiose feeling of it all. I suspect a highlights tour would be a great way to enjoy the museum in another way.

When many people think of Russia, an image of St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow comes to mind. As lovely as that church is, it really does not hold a candle to St. Petersburg’s finest gem, The Church of the Savior on Spilled Blood.

Engaging from the outside, we were absolutely blown away by the sights awaiting us inside. Stunning mosaics of lapis blue and gold are stunningly beautiful pack the entire church with floor-to-ceiling Bible scenes and Orthodox icons. I’ve seen many churches and mosques around the world but this one absolutely takes the cake. Certainly a sight that cannot be missed.

Following that stunner, we wandered over to the Russian Museum close by. Recommended by a friend, the Russian Museum proved to be truly charming. I would compare it as the D’Orsay to the Hermitage’s Louvre – much more my pace and with an accessibility that would appeal to any viewer. Works by the Russian Impressionists such as Malyavin and Futurists like Natalia Goncharova (my new favorite artist) were placed in timeline order, allowing us to weave our way through Russian Art History with ease. I cannot wait to return to the folk art collection, which is exquisite and deserving of a truly proper look.

St. Isaac’s Cathedral proved another highlight of St. Pete’s. With its gold-plated dome and full columns made of lapis and malachite, the church takes gilded to a whole new level. Preserved during Soviet times as a “museum dedicated to atheism”, this literal gem of St. Petersburg is another must-see.

Getting around in St. Pete’s is quite easy – it’s a walkable city. Should you need a lift, Uber is also available (and highly recommended so not to get ripped off). With all the trekking we managed, we also took the time to enjoy a number of delicious restaurants, both recommended by friends.

Mansarga (seen in the Cyrillic below) is part of the Ginza Project group of restaurants, which boast fabulous reputations in both Moscow and St. Pete’s. With a direct view across to St. Isaac’s gold dome, it’s the perfect setting for a delicious meal with no crazy pretense. In fact, lack of pretense was the name of the game in St. Pete’s. The people were lovely and never did I feel in over my head when out to dinner.

For a special occasion, the restaurant at the Grand Hotel L’Europe is the absolute tops. Saturday night is jazz night and never have I been so looked after by a slew of friendly waiters. One even bothered to bring my father a bowl of borscht so he would not be “lonely” while my mother and I finished our appetizers. Truly a 5-star meal in every way.

We loved our stay at the Hotel Indigo with its panoramic view over the rooftops. Watching a storm roll across the bay one night with a beautiful sunset the next, we could ask for better.

The St. Petersburg trip proved a wonderful getaway from the hustle and bustle of cosmopolitan Moscow. The high-speed Sapsan train made our 4-hour ride fly by with all the luxury and comfort of a Korean KTX train. I’m already looking forward to my next visit, hopefully in the fall when the leaves are changing. For now, I’ll leave you with this gem of a pic, the latest in Russian fashion. On to the next, my friends!

Privet, comrade!